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Your Free Time Card Calculator

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Your Free Time Card Calculator

Enter your time in 24-hour format.

Day
Clock In
Break In
Break Out
Clock Out
Total
Monday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Tuesday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Wednesday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Thursday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Friday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Saturday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Sunday
Clock In
:
Break In
:
Break Out
:
Clock Out
:
Total
00:00
Total Hours
00:00

Use Toggl Track, the free alternative to manual time cards

How much did you earn?

Rounded time: 00 hours 00 minutes
hours per week
This field is required
per hour
This field is required
times base rate
This field is required

Your Total Pay: $0.00

Calculate your wages easily

This free time card calculator will help you quickly tally and print the hours you work in any given week and easily calculate the pay you can expect to receive. Enjoy!

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In-depth instructions

We've made it as easy as possible to use this free time card calculator. Simply follow these steps and you'll be able to tally your earnings in no time.

Step #1: Enter all your hours

First, you'll need to input your hours for the week into the time card calculator. You'll notice that every day of the week gets its own row. Add the time you clocked in and out for each day worked, as well as the start and end times of your break.

It's important to remember that this time card calculator works in a 24 hour time format. For example, Jim started work at 9:00am on Monday. He took a break at 1:00pm for 30 minutes before resuming his duties. He then clocked out at 5:00pm that evening.

To accurately tally his hours for the day, Jim puts "09:00" into the "Clock In" column for Monday. He also inputs "13:00" for the "Break In" time, "13:30" for the "Break Out" time, and "17:00" for the "Clock Out" time. The "Total" column then tells Jim he worked 7.5 hours on Monday.


Step #2: Decide a rounding option

After your time has been posted for each day of the week that you worked, scroll down to the "How Much Did You Earn?" section. You'll notice that there are five areas of information, four of which you can manipulate.

The first area, titled "Rounding?", allows you to round your time to the nearest 5, 10, 15, 30, or 60 minute mark, or turn off rounding all together. Choose the option that corresponds to your company's payment policies.

Skipping over the "Rounded Time" section which is just a calculation of the hours you tallied above and cannot be changed without adjusting the actual time card, we come to the "Calculate Overtime After" box where you can set the weekly number of hours after which you're paid overtime wages. This is usually 40 hours per week if you are a full-time employee.


Step #3: Enter your base pay rate

The next one is the "Base Pay Rate" box. How much do you make per hour? Simply input your hourly rates into this field.


Step #4: Enter your overtime rate

Finally, again referring to your company's payment policies, insert your "Overtime Rate".

Many companies pay time and a half for hours worked above a typical 40-hour work week, so that's what this time card calculator defaults to. You'll need to adjust this figure if your organization uses a different rate.

Once all relevant details have been entered into the time card calculator, you'll be able to easily see an accurate calculation of your weekly earnings.

Important Wages Information

In the U.S., the federal minimum wage is currently set at $7.25 an hour, as established in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). But many states in the Union also have their own minimum wage requirements. In the case that these two figures conflict, employees are entitled to the higher of the two wages.

For example, the minimum wage in Florida is $8.25 an hour. This is a full dollar higher than the Federal minimum wage, but employees residing in the Sunshine State are entitled to this higher amount.

While on the topic of wages, there are a few more important details you need to be aware of:

Overtime

In the U.S., federal law mandates that employees who have clocked more than 40 hours in any given work week are entitled to a minimum of one and a half times pay for each extra hour.

Using the time card calculator above, you can easily discover your weekly wage, including overtime. Let's say that you worked a total of nine hours a day, Monday through Friday, and your base pay is $20 an hour. Your total hours worked would tally 45 (40 regular and five overtime hours), resulting in $950. The math equation is as follows:

$20 (your normal hourly wage) [multiplied by] 40 (the amount of regular hours you worked) + $30 (your 1.5x overtime hourly rate) [multiplied by] 5 (the amount of overtime hours you worked).

Make sense?


Exempt and Nonexempt Employees

There are two kinds of employees in the U.S. according to the FLSA: exempt and nonexempt.

Nonexempt employees, most of which are hourly workers, are those entitled to both minimum wage and overtime pay of at least 1.5x their standard wage.

Exempt employees, on the other hand, are not protected by the FLSA and therefore not entitled to overtime pay. Typical "exempt" positions include executives, sales people, seasonal workers, farm workers, and other salaried professionals.

Often times it can be difficult to properly classify yourself as exempt or nonexempt. If you're having trouble, ask yourself these three simple questions:

  1. Do I make at least $23,600 a year? (Roughly $455 a week.)
  2. Am I paid on salary rather than by the hour?
  3. Do I perform certain "exempt" job duties such as manage a department or supervise other employees, perform administrative duties in an office, or accomplish work that requires advanced knowledge?

If you answered "yes" to all three of these questions, you're likely an exempt worker and NOT entitled to either a minimum wage of at least $7.25 an hour (in the U.S.) or overtime pay under federal law.

Track employee work hours with ease

Toggl Track is the time tracker that can slot into any team's workflow. Get crystal-clear insights into what your team members do with their time and see which team members are overworked, and which ones can take on more.

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Track time with Toggl Track - Calendar view

Where Do Time Cards Come From?

Time cards were first introduced during the industrial revolution as a way to more efficiently track the working hours of factory workers. The first successful time recording machine was invented by Daniel M. Cooper in 1894 and named the Rochester Time Recorder.

Over the years, technology developed and time card calculators became more advanced. Mega corporation IBM even created a time recorder division within their company to further progress in this field.

Today, the easiest way to track your time and tally your hours is with Toggl Track. Toggl Track will let you easily track your work hours on various platforms (mobile, desktop and web) and the free time card calculator on this page will help you crunch the numbers and accurately predict your weekly earnings. Good luck!

Sign up for Toggl Track

All plans come with a free, 30-day trial of Toggl Track Premium—no credit card required. You can choose to upgrade at the end of the trial or continue using Track for free.

Prefer a product demo instead?

Teams of 10+ are eligible for a personalized demo to see how Toggl Track can meet your time tracking goals

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